Archive for May, 2012

A Few Words About Growth: Activities vs. Results

By Jim McCarthy 0 comments

I really enjoyed a short series that Adam Thurman did recently about growth in organizations (though he was specifically talking about arts organizations.)  He wrote three succinct but powerful little pieces that, if I presume to summarize, go about like this: There are legitimate reasons to grow or to want to grow as an organization, […]

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    My Memorial Day Thought

    By Jim McCarthy 0 comments

    Aristotle said “courage is the first of human qualities because it guarantees all the others.” Today it’s worth stopping to think about those whose courage guaranteed our comfort, safety, and freedom. Share and Enjoy

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      The REAL Problem with Facebook

      By Jim McCarthy 2 comments

      It isn’t the IPO, which really was fine (potential shenanigans with the numbers aside).  Anytime someone gives you billions of dollars and you suddenly find that you’re officially worth even more billions of dollars than that, you’re having a good day. No, that’s not it. I’ve been saying (and even writing) this for years: online […]

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        Woven into the Fabric

        By Jim McCarthy 0 comments

        I picked up on a couple of fascinating developments in pro sports today that should make people in all parts of the business stop and think. First, there’s the (to me anyway) startling news that the New York Yankees could be for sale.  Team management denies it, but that may mean little more than that […]

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          How to be Open to Criticism

          By Jim McCarthy 0 comments

          For those who don’t follow the inner workings of the opera world on a day to day basis, you might have missed the story yesterday, in which Peter Gelb, the General Manager of the Metropolitan Opera, declared that Opera News (which is affiliated with the Met) would no longer be allowed to publish reviews of […]

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            Revenue Per Seat-A Refresher

            By Jim McCarthy 0 comments

            With all the new readers on the site lately, I thought it was time to double back and cover some important territory: Revenue Per Seat. Revenue per seat is a metric that everyone in live entertainment should use, but most don’t.  It measure not what your average price per ticket is, but what your average […]

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              Two Types of Dynamic Pricing (And I’ll Tell You Which is My Favorite)

              By Jim McCarthy 0 comments

              As I have foretold for years, dynamic pricing is not just coming but has arrived in the live entertainment biz.  It’s most widely adopted in sports, but has made inroads in the arts and concerts as well. Every now and then, I find it useful to stop and give people a little reminder about dynamic […]

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                What’s Happened to Live Entertainment and a Word about TED

                By Jim McCarthy 0 comments

                You might have heard there’s been some “controversy” over a talk that TED  “didn’t want you to see” because it was all about wealth inequality.  I put “controversy” in quotes because, like so much of what sites like Huffington Post do is stir up sentiment for the sake of generating page views. Most of the […]

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                  Venus in Fur

                  By Jim McCarthy 0 comments

                  I spent the first part of this week in New York City for a number of things, but one of them was the Spring Road Conference of the Broadway League.  It’s a gathering where the producers of musicals that are planning to tour the country get together with people who buy the shows in all […]

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                    Correlation and Causality

                    By Jim McCarthy 2 comments

                    A common mistake that humans make is to confuse correlation with causality. For example, did you ever notice that baseball games get canceled right about the time people take out their umbrellas?  From that, I could conclude that when people use umbrellas, it causes umpires to cancel baseball games. Wrong.  Rain causes both.  Rain is […]

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